Archive for March, 2008

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Why you should care about licensing your songs to film/tv

March 31, 2008

Date: March 28, 2008 4:07:19 AM EDT
Subject: Why you should care about licensing your songs to film/tv

Artists ask me all the time “Why should I care about what you do?  About licensing my songs?  And all the music request emails you send out?”  Well, here’s your answer!
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Why is music licensing vital to an artist?

Had you heard of the Moldy Peaches before the movie Juno?

Did you know the Shins big break wasn’t on stage?  It was in the movie Garden State!

Here’s what True Talent Management and groups like that know music licensing can provide an artist’s career:

Revenue

Exposure

Marketing

Airplay

Bankability

Revenue.
Unless you’ve been under a rock, you’ve heard the talk about the death of the music industry.  It’s not dying, it’s transforming.  And artists must transform their business tactics, or well . . . their art will die.  You can make substantial money from licensing your songs.  And all without even hitting the road and paying $ 4 for a gallon of gas.

Exposure
Television is the new radio.  Believe it.  Your song played in a television show has the potential to reach millions of viewers at a time.  Remember television episodes are advertised constantly.  Movie studios spend millions marketing movies.  What other type of advertising pays you and broadens your brand at the same time?

Marketing
Sure, concert sales are down.  Album sales are down.  But relying on just that is the old marketing model.  Today the equation can be this simple: a hot song + a hot show = buzz.  Buzz = web hits, MP3 downloads, and even album sales.  Yes, album sales!  You can still sell them, but today you need these new avenues for getting potential fans to your music.  And get enough exposure through film and TV and record companies will soon be knocking at YOUR door!

Airplay
Airplay used to mean getting in a radio station’s rotation.  Today’s airplay includes commercials, soundtracks, video games, and movie trailers.  Ask Fall Out Boy and Good Charlotte if licensing in video games works.  They’ve been laughing all the way to the bank while you’ve been bugging (or bribing) the DJ to play your song.

Bankability
Be the headliner, the closing act that advertisers depend on.  You want listeners humming your tune even if they never see the movie.  But you’ll be bank if they want to see the movie because they heard your song.  Then advertisers will be coming to you to see what you’re recording next.  Sweet.

Copyright 2008.  True Talent Management. All Rights Reserved.  May not be reprinted without permission.

Jennifer Yeko
True Talent Management
9663 Santa Monica Blvd. # 320
Beverly Hills, CA  90210

~Artist Management~Music Licensing~Music Publicity
http://www.truetalentmgmt.com

“Motivation and determination are 1000 times more potent than talent alone”
-Some guy online
“Be nice to everyone.  You never know if the intern will be the next president of your record company.”
-Michael Buble
QUOTE OF THE WEEK:
“People have to learn they have to juggle everything until they get lucky. They need to work a steady job, make a living and make time for the band. They need to take all the money they make from the band and throw it back into the band”
–David Draiman, Vocalist for Disturbed, interviewed in Music Connection

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A major label record producer’s biggest pet peeve

March 3, 2008

Date: March 3, 2008 4:09:12 PM EST
Subject: A major label record producer’s biggest pet peeve

I hear this complaint all the time from producers that produce major label acts.

They complain:

Artists can’t sing.

They need to use auto-tune.

This begs the question – then how do these artists become popular?

Drive.  Determination.  Hard work.

It’s almost like talent is irrelevant for many major label acts (not all, but quite a few).

And like it or not, that formula has worked for major labels for quite some time now.

Will the tide shift?

I think so.  But it won’t come from the majors.

Indie labels are developing some of the best talent out there right now.  They may be smaller but they have a longer term view than looking to sign a one hit wonder.

So, if you sing well, if you make great music, and write great songs, maybe a major label isn’t for you.  Maybe you should find yourself a good indie label — or better yet, start one yourself!

Will the tide shift for the major labels?  Will they start signing more true “artists”?

Maybe….but I kinda doubt it.

Myspace has created legions of average and mediocre artists.  I see no one breaking out of the mold.  I haven’t heard the next “Nirvana” on myspace.

So, if you truly want to get signed to a “major” label, make sure you work your ass off.  Because, quite frankly, that is far more important than whether or not you can sing.  The label will put you with “hit” songwriters and producers.  But, if you want a major label deal, you better be young and make radio friendly pop music – or something equally catchy that can get on the radio.

Drive?  No one can force you to work harder.  Maybe someone can give you a swift kick….but you have to find that drive from within yourself if you want to make it big!

Jennifer Yeko
True Talent Management
9663 Santa Monica Blvd. # 320
Beverly Hills, CA  90210

~Artist Management~Music Publicity~Marketing
http://www.truetalentmgmt.com

“Motivation and determination are 1000 times more potent than talent alone”
-Some guy online
“Be nice to everyone.  You never know if the intern will be the next president of your record company.”
-Michael Buble
QUOTE OF THE WEEK:
“People have to learn they have to juggle everything until they get lucky. They need to work a steady job, make a living and make time for the band. They need to take all the money they make from the band and throw it back into the band”
–David Draiman, Vocalist for Disturbed, interviewed in Music Connection